The Grand Budapest Hotel

The Grand Budapest Hotel tells of a legendary concierge at a famous European hotel between the wars and his friendship with a young employee who becomes his trusted protégé. The story involves the theft and recovery of a priceless Renaissance painting, the battle for an enormous family fortune and the slow and then sudden upheavals that transformed Europe during the first half of the 20th century.
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Credits: TheMovieDb.

Film Cast:

  • Monsieur Gustave H.: Ralph Fiennes
  • Young Zero Moustafa: Tony Revolori
  • Dmitri Desgoffe-und-Taxis: Adrien Brody
  • J.G. Jopling: Willem Dafoe
  • Agatha: Saoirse Ronan
  • Deputy Vilmos Kovacs: Jeff Goldblum
  • Old Zero Moustafa: F. Murray Abraham
  • Serge X.: Mathieu Amalric
  • Inspector Albert Henckels: Edward Norton
  • Young Writer: Jude Law
  • Monsieur Ivan: Bill Murray
  • Ludwig: Harvey Keitel
  • Second Waiter (1968): Uwe Holoubek
  • Monsieur Jean: Jason Schwartzman
  • Clotilde: Léa Seydoux
  • Madame Céline Villeneuve Desgoffe-und-Taxis: Tilda Swinton
  • Old Author: Tom Wilkinson
  • Monsieur Chuck: Owen Wilson
  • Pinky: Florian Lukas
  • Monsieur Martin: Bob Balaban
  • Monsieur Robin: Fisher Stevens
  • Monsieur Georges: Wallace Wolodarsky
  • Monsieur Dino: Waris Ahluwalia
  • Mr. Mosher: Larry Pine
  • Wolf: Karl Markovics
  • Günther: Volker Michalowski
  • Anatole: Daniel Steiner
  • Ernst: Hendrik von Bültzingslöwen
  • Grande Dame: Lisa Kreuzer
  • Herr Mendl: Rainer Reiners
  • Laetizia: Sabine Urig
  • Prison Guard: Matthias Matschke
  • Monk: Philipp Sonntag
  • Monk: Hans Martin Stier
  • Serge’s Sister: Giselda Volodi
  • Lieutenant: Neal Huff
  • Head Waiter (1968): Steffen Scheumann
  • Franz: Milton Welsh
  • Taxi Driver: Piet Paes
  • Marguerite: Michaela Caspar
  • Carolina: Heike Hanold-Lynch
  • Old Man: Roy Macready
  • Distant Relation: Carl Sprague
  • Lutz Police Militia: Golo Euler
  • Parcel Inspector: Roman Berger
  • Snitch: Michael Benthin
  • Pump Attendant: Lucas Hedges
  • Monk: Wolfgang Ceczor
  • Monk: Georg Tryphon
  • Otto: Gabriel Rush
  • Soldier: Hannes Wegener
  • Soldier: Gerald Sullivan
  • Soldier: Ben Howard
  • Zig-Zag: Marko Dyrlich
  • Student: Jella Niemann
  • Author’s Grandson: Marcel Mazur
  • Alpine Hiker: Robert Bienas
  • Composer: Oliver Claridge
  • Businessman: Bernhard Kremser
  • Actor: Kunichi Nomura
  • Nun: Sister Anna Rademacher
  • Bather: Heinz-Werner Jeschkowski
  • Schoolteacher: Sabine Euler
  • Widow: Renate Klein
  • Igor: Paul Schlase
  • Chauffeur: Darin Damjanow
  • Crippled Shoeshine Boy: Dar Ronge
  • Herr Schneider: Robin Hurlstone
  • Frau Liebling: Jutta Westphal
  • Grande Dame: Gisela Bech
  • Grande Dame: Birgit Müller
  • Grande Dame: Ursula Kuhnt
  • Grande Dame: Monika Krüger
  • Herr Becker: Wolfram Nielacny
  • Young Man: John Peet
  • Lutz Police Militia: Jürgen Schwämmle
  • Giant Convict: Frank Jacob
  • Lobby Boy: Lennart Meyer
  • Lobby Boy: Alfred Hänel
  • Lobby Boy: Manpreet Gerlach
  • Lobby Boy: David Adamik
  • Lobby Boy: Moritz Hepper
  • Cook: David Cioffi
  • Soldier: Oliver Hazell
  • Judge: Bohumil Váchal
  • ‘Boy with Apple’ (model): Ed Munro
  • Footman (1932): Francesco Zippel
  • Footman (1932): Enrico Hoffmann
  • Housekeeper (1932): Marie Goyette
  • Doorman (1932): Jeno Orosz
  • Doorman (1932): Gyula Lukács
  • Front Desk (1932): Georg Rittmannsperger
  • Front Desk (1932): Dirk Bossmann
  • Front Desk (1932): Arwin Lobedann
  • Chef (1932): Matthias Holfert
  • Head Waiter (1932): Reinhold Hegelow
  • Second Waiter (1932): Steffen Nixdorf
  • Front Desk (1968): Manfred Lindner

Film Crew:

  • Set Decoration: Anna Pinnock
  • Casting: Jina Jay
  • Stunt Coordinator: Volkhart Buff
  • Casting: Simone Bär
  • Original Music Composer: Alexandre Desplat
  • Producer: Scott Rudin
  • Casting: Antoinette Boulat
  • Story: Wes Anderson
  • Director of Photography: Robert D. Yeoman
  • Casting: Douglas Aibel
  • Costume Design: Milena Canonero
  • Executive Producer: Henning Molfenter
  • Executive Producer: Charlie Woebcken
  • Art Direction: Stephan O. Gessler
  • Art Department Coordinator: Roxy Konrad
  • Unit Production Manager: Miki Emmrich
  • Story: Stefan Zweig
  • Assistant Set Decoration: Fergus Clegg
  • Property Master: Robin L. Miller
  • Music Supervisor: Randall Poster
  • Hairstylist: Heike Merker
  • Co-Producer: Jane Frazer
  • Supervising Art Director: Gerald Sullivan
  • Editor: Barney Pilling
  • Key Grip: Sanjay Sami
  • Storyboard Artist: Michael Schlingmann
  • Story: Hugo Guinness
  • Producer: Jeremy Dawson
  • Producer: Steven M. Rales
  • Production Design: Adam Stockhausen
  • Executive Producer: Christoph Fisser
  • First Assistant Director: Josh Robertson
  • Costume Supervisor: Patricia Colin
  • Script Supervisor: Alexandra Torterotot
  • First Assistant Camera: Christian Almesberger
  • Executive Producer: Molly Cooper
  • Driver: Nils Konrad
  • Music Editor: Yann McCullough
  • Gaffer: Helmut Prein
  • Casting: Alexandra Montag
  • Music: Simon Rhodes
  • Supervising Sound Editor: Christopher Scarabosio
  • Supervising Sound Editor: Wayne Lemmer
  • Visual Effects Editor: Mark Edward Wright
  • Sound Mixer: Pawel Wdowczak
  • Location Manager: Klaus Große Darrelmann
  • Hairstylist: Norma Webb
  • Animatronic and Prosthetic Effects: Mark Coulier
  • Makeup & Hair: Frances Hannon
  • Hairstylist: Julie Dartnell
  • Animatronic and Prosthetic Effects: Duncan Jarman
  • Associate Producer: Octavia Peissel
  • Digital Compositors: Thorsten Rienth
  • Post Production Supervisor: Gisela Evert
  • Standby Painter: Roman Berger
  • Second Assistant Director: Ben Howard
  • Assistant Set Decoration: Katharina Birkenfeld
  • Grip: Jan Brun
  • Associate Producer: John Peet
  • Second Unit Director: Martin Scali
  • Other: Katharina Hingst
  • Set Designer: Josef Brandl
  • Graphic Designer: Annie Atkins
  • Crowd Assistant Director: Candy Marlowe
  • Finance: Dan Hillsdon
  • Set Decorating Coordinator: Carolin Langenbahn

Movie Reviews:

  • Andres Gomez: Yet another well crafter Wes Anderson’s movie. Fiennes and Revolori perform well and the amount of well known actors and actresses is incredible but we have seen similar ways and scripts in his previous movies.

    It’s entertaining, though.

  • CRCulver: Wes Anderson’s THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL is the director’s celebration of Central Europe culture and fashion in the years between the World Wars, and an elegy for what was lost with the rise of fascism and communism. Set in 1932 in a fictional country called Zubrowka, the streets, military regalia and (ersatz) German names we are shown could have come from anywhere between Germany and Estonia. Its protagonist Gustave H. (Ralph Fiennes) is a concierge at the eponymous luxury hotel, the splendour of which disappeared, we are told, with World War II. Gustave H. is known publicly as one of the best concierges in the business, able to dash around the hotel at lightning speed to satisfy the most varied guests of the elite clientele. Privately, he’s a rake with a rather foul mouth, and fond of bedding the rich old women who patronize the establishment. When one of those old ladies, Madame Céline Villeneuve Desgoffe und Taxis (Tilda Swinton) dies and Gustave is framed for her murder, he must evade the law and unmask the true culprit, with the help of newly hired lobby boy Zero Mustafa (Tony Revolori).

    The films of Wes Anderson are known for their immense visual detail, and THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL is no exception. The elaborate framing of shots, the myriad cute items to look at on every set, and the architectural detail are like a diorama blown up to the big screen. Curiously, that visual detail is matched to a real slackness in the human characterization. Anderson has brought in a large number of actors he had worked with before, including Adrien Brody, Jeff Goldblum, Ed Norton, and Bill Murray, for roles that range from the main villain to little more than cameos. These characters are never fleshed out like Gustave H. or Zero Mustafa, and the actors don’t even try to pass themselves off as Central Europeans from the entre deux guerres. Instead Adrien Brody plays Adrien Brody, etc.

    There are two supporting roles that I felt were stronger. William Defoe plays a nearly mute henchman whose look is a nod to early vampire films (Transylvania was Central Europe, too). More remarkable is Harvey Keitel’s turn as an old prisoner: when so many handsome leading men try to hide the effects of time after they enter their sunset years, 75-year-old Keitel was not afraid to show the ravages of old age here.

    Unfortunately, I found the 21st-century Americans strutting about (and a few speaking in rough New York accents) in a historical drama to be jarring. I was also disappointed by the resort to Hollywood tropes here, when Anderson’s earlier films managed to be very quirky and sui generis. For example, did we really need not just one scene where a character is hanging off a cliff’s edge as the villain stands over him, but two? And the amount of plot details that are introduced but never really explained makes one feel that the work was subject to some heavy cuts to please a studio.

    Still, if you liked Wes Anderson’s earlier films, you’ll find much to enjoy in his dollhouse approach, and it is amazing how every one of his films has a completely new and fresh visual theming even if his quasi-autistic obsession with prettiness never changes. Another thing I liked about the film is its “story within a story within a story”. The entire plot of Gustave H. is, we are shown, taken from a fictionalized treatment by a writer who met a middle-aged Mustafa (F. Murray Abraham) in the 1960s. Befitting this novelistic layer — and the work of Stefan Zweig that Anderson credits for inspiration — this framing story is written in stilted, unrealistic dialogue like an old-time novel. And the aspect ratio changes for each layer of the film, a little treat for cinema anoraks.

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