Song of the Sea

The story of the last Seal Child’s journey home. After their mother’s disappearance, Ben and Saoirse are sent to live with Granny in the city. When they resolve to return to their home by the sea, their journey becomes a race against time as they are drawn into a world Ben knows only from his mother’s folktales. But this is no bedtime story; these fairy folk have been in our world far too long. It soon becomes clear to Ben that Saoirse is the key to their survival.
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Credits: TheMovieDb.

Film Cast:

  • Conor / Mac Lir (voice): Brendan Gleeson
  • Granny / Macha (voice): Fionnula Flanagan
  • Lug (voice): Pat Shortt
  • Ferry Dan / The Great Seanachaí (voice): Jon Kenny
  • Bronach (voice): Lisa Hannigan
  • Ben (voice): David Rawle
  • Saoirse (voice): Lucy O’Connell
  • Mossy (voice): Colm Ó’Snodaigh
  • Spud / Bus Driver (voice): Liam Hourican
  • Young Ben (voice): Kevin Swierszcz
  • Additional Voices (voice): Will Collins
  • Additional Voices: Paul Young

Film Crew:

  • Editorial Coordinator: Darren T. Holmes
  • Original Music Composer: Bruno Coulais
  • Story: Tomm Moore
  • Other: Nora Twomey
  • Additional Music: Kila
  • Editor: Darragh Byrne
  • Co-Producer: Serge Umé
  • Art Direction: Adrien Merigeau
  • Writer: Will Collins
  • Animation Director: Frederik Villumsen
  • Co-Producer: Stéphan Roelants
  • Visual Effects Supervisor: Eric Dupont
  • Recording Supervision: Garret Farrell
  • Thanks: Tod Polson
  • Co-Producer: Isabelle Truc
  • Production Manager: Claus Toksvig Kjaer
  • Production Manager: Katja Schumann
  • Co-Producer: Clément Calvet
  • Co-Producer: Jérémie Fajner
  • Color Designer: Pascal Nowak
  • Animation: Slaven Reese
  • Associate Producer: Samuel Feller
  • Visual Effects Supervisor: Marc Umé
  • Publicist: Joshua Jason
  • Animation: Ole Christian Løken
  • First Assistant Director: Stuart Shankly
  • Character Designer: Sandra Norup Andersen
  • First Assistant Director: Fabian Erlinghäuser
  • Animation: Geoff King
  • Art Department Coordinator: Ross Stewart
  • Producer: Paul Young
  • Conductor: Patrice Renson
  • Animation: Tomislav Findrik
  • Producer: Ross Murray
  • Animation: Santiago Lopez Jover
  • Animation: Mathilde Vachet
  • Line Producer: Thibaut Ruby
  • Software Engineer: Michel Hick
  • Animation: Virgile Bage
  • Background Designer: Sidonie Vidal
  • Storyboard Designer: Alessandra Sorrentino
  • Production Intern: Susana Grilo
  • Production Accountant: Atshong Chen
  • Sound Re-Recording Mixer: Nostradine Benguezzou
  • Sound Re-Recording Mixer: Marie Doyeux
  • Sound Designer: Félix Davin
  • Sound Designer: Alexandre Jaclain
  • Animation: Danas Berznitsky
  • Animation: Svend Andreas Rothmann Bonde
  • Animation: Alfredo Cassano
  • Animation: Giovanna Ferrari
  • Animation: Denis Figueiredo
  • Animation: Walter Giampaglia
  • Animation: Marion Roussel
  • Animation: Stine Sæthre
  • Animation: Louise Bergholt Sørensen
  • Character Designer: Rosa Ballester Cabo
  • Character Designer: Marie Thorhauge
  • VFX Artist: François Crèvecoeur
  • Visual Effects Supervisor: Jeremy Purcell

Movie Reviews:

  • Reno: If you ever watched ‘The Secret of Kells’, you will never think of skipping it. Though, people watch it in the interest of the Oscar connection. From all the nominees it is the clear winner according to me, even far better than the real winner ‘Big Hero 6’. The American Academy Awards had failed to recognise the true ingenuity. That does not stop win the heart the of millions of children around the world. As for the adults, it makes you feel young again for a while. Lots of humour in it with faint emotions at the end along the kids favoured flavour throughout.

    Far East and far West film industries ruling the animation production, but Tomm Moore from Ireland is trying to open the new gate from the European division. Not many people are aware of him, one more movie and its success may lead to the greater heights for sure. This animation technics are very unique, but not the first time in the use.

    The character illustrations were cuter to enchant the young kids. Watching the movie is like reading a children’s storybook with the large pictures everywhere and a couple of lines of words in the corner of the page. Like the anime in Japan and 3D animation in Hollywood, this would mark the Euro on the map. There are many animations are made and still making in Europe, but this one is the new perspective of hope to reach all the major and remote places of the Earth. Wish it moves in the right direction.

    If you had known how all the fairy tales work, you would feel you can predict this story because, you know defeating evil, breaking curses, the happy endings are the usual part. So what matters is the storytelling, how well the stories are presented on the screen. This film excels in that point, and the music is the another highlight of the movie. Whoever the music director/composer I must praise him. Almost a year ago I saw the trailer for the first time and I felt like I already loved the movie, mainly because of the music.

    ”Hold this shell to your ear and listen carefully. You will hear the song of the sea.”

    In his earlier movie the director told a simple and short story extraordinarily, and still I hum that beautiful ‘Aisling song’ sometime. This movie had a wonderful adventure story of a boy called Ben and his little sister Saoirse. In the journey of running away from an owl witch, the magical creatures and an ancient seashell guide them a path. On the right time the title song makes the way to delight next 10 minutes of the crucial segment in the narration. I love the original version, in Irish even though I don’t understand. It was good and catchy, even for the grown ups as well. Feels like, want to visit those places from the movie, but sadly our only option is Disneyland, huh.

    Disney and Studio Ghibli are the king and queen of fairy tale movies. No one would, but if you are mildly fed up of those, here the new dimensional fresh tales from the Ireland’s folklore. Though, it sets in the modern world, but does not abandon to bring the key factors. Like the ancient meet the modern world with the same intensity. Kind of new to hear the words like Selkie, Macha etc., but, brand new for the people who live thousands of kilometers away in the different continents. Animation movie fanatics would love it, but if there are any children like niece and nephew in your home or visits you, watch it with them on that occasion and you would feel differently.

    9/10

  • Kamurai: Great watch, would watch again, and do recommend.

    The animation in this beautiful, and some of it reminds me (vaguely) of “Spirited Away”, but makes more sense. I’m sure the relation is the sense that “Spirited Away” is Miyazaki’s display of the Japanese fey, though it is apparently in several other movies (e.g. “My Neighbor Totoro”, “Ponyo”).

    This is a movie of great tragedy and powerful feelings, but ultimately is about appreciating your family and people while they are there. There is charm and uplifting feelings to the entire situation: you’re not just going to be depressed or moved.

    As the introduction of the fey start, it is very unclear what is real and what is magic, or if the magic is real. That surreal attitude to this child’s adventure seemed to add to the charm of dealing with the situation.

    The only problem I have with the movie is this ambiguity, there are so many parallels (that often occur in fey stories) to reality that you can’t tell if this is a story of how a boy imagined an adventure, or if it’s a fey story full of hidden magic.

    The details they go into are amazing if you look. Even the tears shared between fey and human are different. The details go on, and while I’m not sure if the quality is better, worse, or just different to a Miyazaki film, I feel it was made with the same consideration for how the audience is supposed to feel as they watch in the same way he created.

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