Frozen

Young princess Anna of Arendelle dreams about finding true love at her sister Elsa’s coronation. Fate takes her on a dangerous journey in an attempt to end the eternal winter that has fallen over the kingdom. She’s accompanied by ice delivery man Kristoff, his reindeer Sven, and snowman Olaf. On an adventure where she will find out what friendship, courage, family, and true love really means.
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Credits: TheMovieDb.

Film Cast:

  • Anna (voice): Kristen Bell
  • Elsa (voice): Idina Menzel
  • Kristoff (voice): Jonathan Groff
  • Sven (voice): Frank Welker
  • Olaf (voice): Josh Gad
  • Hans (voice): Santino Fontana
  • Duke (voice): Alan Tudyk
  • Pabbie / Grandpa (voice): Ciarán Hinds
  • Oaken (voice): Chris Williams
  • Kai (voice): Stephen J. Anderson
  • Bulda (voice): Maia Wilson
  • Gerda (voice): Edie McClurg
  • Bishop (voice): Robert Pine
  • King (voice): Maurice LaMarche
  • Teen Elsa (voice): Spencer Lacey Ganus
  • Young Anna (voice): Livvy Stubenrauch
  • Young Elsa (voice): Eva Bella
  • Spanish Dignitary (voice): Jesse Corti
  • German Dignitary (voice): Jeffrey Marcus
  • Irish Dignitary (voice): Tucker Gilmore
  • Additional Voices (voice): Ava Acres
  • Additional Voices (voice): Stephen Apostolina
  • Additional Voices (voice): Annaleigh Ashford
  • Additional Voices (voice): Kirk Baily
  • Additional Voices (voice): Jenica Bergere
  • Additional Voices (voice): David Boat
  • Additional Voices (voice): Paul Briggs
  • Additional Voices (voice): Tyree Brown
  • Additional Voices (voice): Woody Buck
  • Additional Voices (voice): June Christopher
  • Additional Voices (voice): Lewis Cleale
  • Additional Voices (voice): Wendy Cutler
  • Additional Voices (voice): Terri Douglas
  • Additional Voices (voice): Eddie Frierson
  • Additional Voices (voice): Jean Gilpin
  • Additional Voices (voice): Jackie Gonneau
  • Additional Voices (voice): Nicholas Guest
  • Additional Voices (voice): Bridget Hoffman
  • Additional Voices (voice): Nick Jameson
  • Additional Voices (voice): Daniel Kaz
  • Additional Voices (voice): John Lavelle
  • Additional Voices (voice): Jennifer Lee
  • Additional Voices (voice): Patricia Lentz
  • Additional Voices (voice): Annie Lopez
  • Additional Voices (voice): Katie Lowes
  • Additional Voices (voice): Mona Marshall
  • Additional Voices (voice): Dara McGarry
  • Additional Voices (voice): Scott Menville
  • Additional Voices (voice): Adam Overett
  • Additional Voices (voice): Paul Pape
  • Additional Voices (voice): Courtney Peldon
  • Additional Voices (voice): Jennifer Perry
  • Additional Voices (voice): Raymond S. Persi
  • Additional Voices (voice): Jean-Michel Richaud
  • Additional Voices (voice): Lynwood Robinson
  • Additional Voices (voice): Carter Sand
  • Additional Voices (voice): Jadon Sand
  • Additional Voices (voice): Katie Silverman
  • Additional Voices (voice): Pepper Sweeney
  • Additional Voices (voice): Fred Tatasciore
  • Gothi – Troll Priest (voice, uncredited): Jack Whitehall

Film Crew:

  • Executive Producer: John Lasseter
  • Animation: John Kahrs
  • Color Timer: Jim Passon
  • Original Music Composer: Christophe Beck
  • Supervising Sound Editor: Odin Benitez
  • Story: Chris Buck
  • Producer: Peter Del Vecho
  • Production Design: David Womersley
  • Orchestrator: Dave Metzger
  • Author: Hans Christian Andersen
  • Foley Editor: Charles W. Ritter
  • Dialogue Editor: Eliza Pollack Zebert
  • Story: Shane Morris
  • Casting: Jamie Sparer Roberts
  • ADR Voice Casting: Terri Douglas
  • Thanks: Warner Loughlin
  • Thanks: Michael Goi
  • Animation: Andrew Lawson
  • Original Music Composer: Jake Monaco
  • Conductor: Jasper Randall
  • Post Production Supervisor: Brent W. Hall
  • Production Supervisor: Mike Huang
  • Executive Music Producer: Chris Montan
  • Editor: Jeff Draheim
  • Musician: George Doering
  • Production Supervisor: Angela Frances D’Anna
  • Production Supervisor: Dara McGarry
  • Foley: John Roesch
  • Thanks: Brian Wherry
  • Story: Jennifer Lee
  • Lighting Artist: Ellen Poon
  • Visual Effects Supervisor: Steve Goldberg
  • Supervising Dialogue Editor: Christopher T. Welch
  • Songs: Robert Lopez
  • Animation: Clay Kaytis
  • Music Supervisor: Tom MacDougall
  • Thanks: Lynwood Robinson
  • Storyboard: Nicole Mitchell
  • Songs: Kristen Anderson-Lopez
  • Music Editor: Fernand Bos
  • Sound Effects Editor: Greg Hedgepath
  • Visual Effects: Marlon West
  • Foley: Alyson Dee Moore
  • Sound Designer: Angelo Palazzo
  • Sound Effects Editor: Stephen P. Robinson
  • Sound Effects Editor: Jeff Sawyer
  • Lighting Artist: Diana J. Zeng
  • Sound Effects Editor: Martyn Zub
  • Associate Producer: Aimee Scribner
  • Animation: Bert Klein
  • Visual Development: James Finn
  • Layout: Rick Moore
  • Layout: Merrick Rustia
  • Art Department Manager: Bill Schwab
  • Layout: Matsune Suzuki
  • Layout: Kendra Vander Vliet
  • Layout: Scott Armstrong
  • Visual Development: Julia Kalantarova
  • Camera Department Manager: Thomas Baker
  • Creature Technical Director: Jennifer Downs
  • Animation: Brian Menz
  • Rigging Supervisor: Gregory Smith
  • Animation: Kevin MacLean
  • Animation: Marlon Nowe
  • Animation: Mitja Rabar
  • Animation: Kathy Zielinski
  • Animation: Steve Cunningham
  • Visual Effects: Jessie Erikson
  • Animation: Mack Kablan
  • Animation: Mike Navarro
  • Animation: Valentín Amador
  • First Assistant Sound Editor: Pernell L. Salinas
  • Animation: Mario Furmanczyk
  • Assistant Art Director: Lisa Keene
  • Animation: Lee Hyun-min
  • Casting Associate: Cymbre Walk
  • Modeling: Florian Perret
  • Creature Technical Director: Andrew Jennings
  • Creature Technical Director: Maia Neubig
  • Modeling: Eric Provan
  • Animation: John Wong
  • Lighting Artist: Olun Riley
  • Lighting Artist: Jeffrey Benedict
  • Production Supervisor: James E. Hasman
  • Production Supervisor: Kristin Yadamec
  • Lighting Supervisor: Josh Staub
  • Visual Development: Michael Giaimo
  • Production Coordinator: Leah Latham
  • ADR & Dubbing: Beauxregard Neylon
  • Lighting Artist: Jason Barlow
  • Lighting Supervisor: Robert L. Miles
  • Lighting Supervisor: Alessandro Jacomini
  • Character Designer: Jin Kim
  • Lighting Artist: Wally Schaab
  • Digital Intermediate: Eliot Milbourn
  • Conductor: Tim Davies
  • Animation: Michael Kiely
  • Animation: Adam Green
  • Animation: Jennifer Hager
  • Animation: Daniel Klug
  • Supervising Animator: Malcon Pierce
  • ADR & Dubbing: Kristin Catuogno
  • Musician: James Thatcher
  • Production Manager: Nicole P. Hearon
  • Production Coordinator: Marisa X. Castro
  • Production Supervisor: Kelly Eisert
  • Production Coordinator: Brandon Holmes
  • Musician: M.B. Gordy
  • Musician: Kevin Connolly
  • Animation: Doug Bennett
  • Animation: Renato Dos Anjos
  • Supervising Animator: Wayne Unten
  • Lighting Supervisor: Mohit Kallianpur
  • Modeling: Samy Segura
  • Character Modelling Supervisor: Chad Stubblefield
  • Supervising Animator: Rebecca Wilson Bresee
  • Animation: Darrin Butters
  • Animation: Youngjae Choi
  • Animation: Christopher Cordingley
  • Animation: Chadd Ferron
  • Supervising Animator: Hyrum Virl Osmond
  • Animation: Amy Lawson Smeed
  • Supervising Animator: Tony Smeed
  • Musician: Matt Chamberlain
  • Musician: Paul S. Henning
  • Best Boy Electrician: Jerry Kim
  • Visual Development: Carol Kieffer Police
  • Musician: Andrew Synowiec
  • Musician: Wade Culbreath
  • Creature Technical Director: Zack Weiler
  • VFX Artist: Bob Bennett
  • Musician: Marina Manukian
  • Lighting Artist: Katherine Ipjian
  • Music Director: Andrew Page
  • Lighting Artist: Onny P. Carr
  • Lighting Artist: Jongo
  • Lighting Artist: Eileen O’Neill
  • Production Supervisor: Nathan Curtis
  • Lighting Supervisor: Jason MacLeod
  • Lighting Artist: Logan Gloor
  • Lighting Artist: Ka Yaw Tan
  • Lighting Artist: Alex Nijmeh
  • Lighting Artist: Jorge Obregon
  • Lighting Artist: Derek Nelson
  • Lighting Artist: Angela McBride
  • Lighting Artist: Jeff Gipson
  • Lighting Artist: Justin Dobies
  • Lighting Artist: Ryan DeYoung
  • Animation: Kira Lehtomaki
  • Animation: Chad Sellers
  • Animation: Robert Christian Huth
  • Animation: Alberto Abril
  • Animation: Andrew Chesworth
  • Animation: Trent Correy
  • Animation: Patrick Danaher
  • Animation: Jeffrey Engel
  • Animation: Jason Figliozzi
  • Animation: Michael Franceschi
  • Animation: Derek Friesenborg
  • Animation: Ryan Hobbiebrunken
  • Animation: Darrell W. Johnson
  • Animation: Kelly McClanahan
  • Animation: Matthew Meyer
  • Animation: Prothais Nicolas
  • Animation: Daniel Martín Peixe
  • Animation Production Assistant: Svetla Radivoeva
  • Animation: Joel Reid
  • Animation: Brian D. Scott
  • Animation: Benson Shum
  • Animation: Geoff Wheeler
  • Animation: Jorge Ruiz
  • Animation: Minor Gaytan
  • Creature Technical Director: Jesus Canal
  • Creature Technical Director: Iker J. de los Mozos
  • Creature Technical Director: Christopher Evart
  • Creature Technical Director: William D. Kastak
  • Creature Technical Director: Hubert Leo
  • Creature Technical Director: Scott Peters
  • Creature Technical Director: Mary Twohig
  • Digital Compositors: Cristian Moras
  • Finance: Tom Body
  • Finance: Frank William Knittel
  • Finance: Linda Y. Matsuoka
  • Lighting Supervisor: Amol Sathe
  • Lighting Artist: Mark Siegel
  • Lighting Artist: Gina Warr
  • Modeling: Irene Matar
  • Musician: Karl Vincent
  • Creature Technical Director: David J. Suroviec
  • Systems Administrators & Support: Rik Bomberger
  • Systems Administrators & Support: Thomas Greer
  • Software Engineer: Meghan Gillet
  • Software Engineer: Garret Sakura
  • Storyboard Artist: Marc Smith
  • Systems Administrators & Support: Kevin C. Constantine
  • Systems Administrators & Support: Kimberly M. Rios
  • Systems Administrators & Support: Jay D. Hilliard
  • ADR & Dubbing: Adam Pleiman
  • Animation: Andrew Atteberry
  • Animation: Joey Brown
  • Animation: Amanda Dague
  • Animation: Eric Daniels
  • Animation: Ryan Gong
  • Animation: Matt Kummer
  • Animation: Burke Roane
  • Animation: Miyuki Kanno Long
  • Animation: Joe Sandstrom
  • Animation: Rastko Stefanovic
  • Assistant Editor: Brian Millman
  • CG Supervisor: Frank Hanner
  • Character Technical Supervisor: Carlos Cabral
  • Character Technical Supervisor: Keith Wilson
  • Creature Technical Director: Jan Berger
  • Creature Technical Director: John Truong
  • Creature Technical Director: Eric Warren
  • Creature Technical Director: Glen Claybrook
  • Creature Technical Director: Casey Dame
  • Creature Technical Director: Rose Ibiama
  • Creature Technical Director: Adam Levy
  • Creature Technical Director: Michael Stieber
  • Creature Technical Director: Marc Thyng
  • Playback Singer: Marijke van Niekerk
  • Conductor: Stephen Oremus
  • Visual Effects Designer: Ian J. Coony
  • Title Designer: Jeremy Chinn
  • Systems Administrators & Support: Steve Carpenter
  • Systems Administrators & Support: Tom Corrigan
  • Systems Administrators & Support: Danny Jewell
  • Systems Administrators & Support: Michael McClure
  • Systems Administrators & Support: Zachary Stokes
  • Systems Administrators & Support: Scott L. Burris
  • Systems Administrators & Support: Marc Jordan
  • Systems Administrators & Support: Paul Takahashi
  • Thanks: Einar Aasen
  • Thanks: Cynthia Ballardo
  • Thanks: Claudia Batcke
  • Thanks: Ingrid Carter
  • Thanks: Tracy Farhad
  • Thanks: Michael Kaschalk
  • Thanks: Kenneth Kenyon
  • Thanks: Diana Kuriyama
  • Thanks: Eva Nordfjell
  • Thanks: Joseph M. Teran
  • Software Engineer: Jose Luis Gomez Diaz
  • Software Engineer: Wendy M. Tam
  • Software Engineer: Rosie Wacha
  • Software Engineer: Graham B. Whitted IV
  • Security: Terry Laraia
  • Production Supervisor: Julie Baner
  • Production Supervisor: Sheri Patterson
  • Production Coordinator: Steph Gortz
  • Production Coordinator: Laura M. Meredith
  • Musician: Serena McKinney
  • Modeling: Virgilio John Aquino
  • Modeling: Brien Hindman
  • Modeling: Juan Solis
  • Modeling: Suzan Kim
  • Modeling: Ryan Tottle
  • Lighting Artist: Adrian Iler
  • Lighting Artist: Blaine Kennison
  • Lighting Artist: MacDuff Knox
  • Lighting Artist: Jonathan Fletcher Moore
  • Lighting Artist: Amy Pfaffinger
  • Lighting Artist: Katie Reihman
  • Lighting Artist: Robert Showalter
  • First Assistant Editor: Anthony Durazzo
  • Finance: Daniel Feiner
  • VFX Artist: Chris Carignan
  • VFX Artist: John Hughes
  • VFX Artist: Daniel Naulin
  • VFX Artist: Hendrik Panz
  • VFX Artist: Blair Pierpont
  • VFX Artist: Alexey Stomakhin
  • VFX Artist: Zubin Wadia
  • VFX Artist: Mir Z. Ali
  • Lighting Artist: Jennifer Yu

Movie Reviews:

  • junijubiroke: “Frozen,” the latest Disney musical extravaganza, preaches the importance of embracing your true nature but seems to be at odds with itself.

    The animated, 3-D adventure wants to enliven and subvert the conventions of typical Disney princess movies while simultaneously remaining true to their aesthetic trappings for maximum merchandising potential. It encourages young women to support and stay loyal to each other—a crucial message when mean girls seem so prevalent—as long as some hunky potential suitors and adorable, wise-cracking creatures also are around to complete them.

    It all seems so cynical, this attempt to shake things up without shaking them up too much. “Frozen” just happens to be reaching theaters as Thanksgiving and the holiday shopping season are arriving. The marketing possibilities are mind-boggling. And in the tradition of the superior “Beauty and the Beast” and “The Little Mermaid,” surely “Frozen: The Musical” will be headed to the Broadway stage soon. The songs – which are lively and amusing if not quite instant hits—are already in place.

    Little girls will absolutely love it, though. That much is undeniable. And the film from co-directors Chris Buck (“Surf’s Up”) and Jennifer Lee is never less than gorgeous to watch. A majestic mountaintop ice castle is particularly exquisite—glittery and detailed and tactile, especially as rendered in 3-D.

    But first we must witness the tortured backstory of the film’s princesses – not one, but two of them. The script from “Wreck-It Ralph” co-writer Lee, inspired by the Hans Christian Andersen story “The Snow Queen,” has lots of cheeky, contemporary touches but is firmly and safely rooted in Scandinavian fairy tale traditions.

    When they were young girls, sisters Anna and Elsa were joyous playmates and inseparable friends. But Elsa’s special power—her ability to turn anything to ice and snow in a flash from her fingertips—comes back to haunt her when she accidentally zaps her sister. (Not unlike the telekinesis in “Carrie,” Elsa inadvertently unleashes her power in moments of heightened emotion.) A magical troll king heals Anna and erases the event from her memory, but as for the sisters’ relationship, the damage is done.

    Elsa’s parents lock her away and close down the castle, which devastates the younger Anna. (Of the many tunes from “Avenue Q” and “The Book of Mormon” songwriter Robert Lopez and his wife, Kristen Anderson-Lopez, the wistful “Do You Want to Build a Snowman?” is by far the most poignant.) But once they reach adolescence and it’s Elsa’s turn to take over the throne at age 18, the two experience an awkward reunion.

    The perky, quirky Anna (now voiced by a likable Kristen Bell) is a little nervous but overjoyed to see her sister. The reserved and reluctant Elsa (Broadway veteran Idina Menzel) remains distant, and with gloved hands hopes not to freeze anything and reveal her true self on coronation day. But a run-in with an amorous, visiting prince (Santino Fontana) who sets his sights on Anna triggers Elsa’s ire, and she inadvertently plunges the sunny, idyllic kingdom into perpetual winter.

    Flustered and fearful, Elsa dashes away in a fit of self-imposed exile – which significantly weakens “Frozen,” since she’s the film’s most complicated and compelling figure. On her way to the highest mountain she can find, Elsa belts out the power ballad “Let It Go,” her version of “I Am Woman.” This soaring declaration of independence is the reason you want a performer of Menzel’s caliber in this role, and it’s the film’s musical highlight. (Her flashy physical transformation from prim princess to ice queen does make her resemble a real housewife of some sort, however.)

    Afterward, though, the story settles in on Anna’s efforts to retrieve her sister and restore order to the kingdom. Along the way she gets help from an underemployed ice salesman named Kristoff (Jonathan Groff) and his trusty reindeer sidekick, Sven. They all meet up with a singing snowman named Olaf (a lovably goofy Josh Gad, star of “The Book of Mormon” on Broadway) who dreams of basking in the warmth of the summer sun. This “Wizard of Oz”-style quartet makes the obstacle-filled trek to the imposing fortress that awaits. (At least “Frozen” has the decency to borrow from excellent source material.)

    While the journey may seem overly familiar, the destination has some surprises in store. Some come out of nowhere and don’t exactly work. But the biggie—the one that’s a real game-changer in terms of the sorts of messages Disney animated classics have sent for decades—is the one that’s important not just for the little girls in the audience, but for all viewers. http://newmoviestream.co/watch/2294629/frozen
    wish everything about the film met the same clever standard.

  • Andres Gomez: I was excited to watch this movie after all the buzz about it but I’ve been a bit disappointed.

    Yes, the animation is great and it keeps all the typical Disney details and is funny, sometimes. In addition, it features two strong female characters that don’t need of a hero to save the story but …

    … but still they are the super-beautiful and perfect Disney princesses, as if they couldn’t be normal girls from normal status, and the role of Queen Elsa is not that important as it would have expected.

    Not a bad movie, but not the best and I think far from the fun I had with Tangled.

  • MSB: If you enjoy reading my Spoiler-Free reviews, please follow my blog 🙂

    Six years later, and Frozen has left an undeniable cultural impact. From Let It Go to tons of merchandising, Chris Buck and Jennifer Lee delivered such a memorable film that people not only didn’t forget but regularly asked for its sequel. As of right now, Frozen II has claimed the third-best animated opening weekend ever, proving that the love for this franchise (I think it’s safe to call it that already) is strong. However, how great is the original movie, after all? To be honest, I never fully watched it until this past week in preparation for its sequel. It surprised me in the sense that I didn’t expect to enjoy it as much as I did. Frozen is deserving of the love it possesses.

    With extremely captivating characters, the story flows naturally, and the entertainment levels are always high. Whether these are due to the amazing singing sequences or to the exciting adventures, this film never stops having fun. That’s what Frozen ultimately is: a lighthearted, fun, and entertaining movie. It follows Disney’s formula for creating a variation of a story we have seen before. Characters go through a traumatic event when they’re young. They have to grow up while struggling with the aftermath of said trauma. Eventually, they overcome that obstacle and live happily ever after (or at least until the next installment).

    It’s the generic and somewhat cliche Disney model for a new animated film (franchise). Nevertheless, don’t get me wrong: it works perfectly. Sure, it doesn’t bring anything new story-wise, but it’s still a great time. Despite some unnecessary and lazy exposition (the magical trolls are basically exposition devices), Frozen still delivers a truly captivating and visually jaw-dropping narrative. I do need to emphasize this: the animation is phenomenal. Elsa’s magic is seamless and beautiful. Arendelle is a gorgeous location, and the snowy mountains are impressively designed. Let It Go will always be remembered for its lyrics and melody, but the actual animated sequence is astonishing.

    Every character carries a lot of expressiveness, which allows them to do basically everything. Frozen might not be a groundbreaking movie, but its compelling characters make the generic plot work. From Elsa and Anna’s complicated but heartwarming relationship to Kristoff and Sven’s camaraderie, I care about all of them… especially Olaf. I know, Olaf is simply the snowman version of a comic-relief character. He doesn’t really have a complex arc in need of extreme development. However, it’s impossible not to love him. He’s such a welcome presence in every single scene. Every single line of his is either a funny remark or a pretty valuable insight into something.

    Counting him out, every other character has a very well explored arc, mainly Elsa and Anna. Their (older) relationship originates from a plot point that might be a tad exaggerated, but it’s convincing enough. Finally, the score is as important as it is fantastic. It’s an animated musical, let us not forget about that. Obviously, Let It Go is the queen of all songs due to its catchy lyrics, memorable chorus, and significance to the character. But other ones such as Do You Wanna Build a Snowman and For the First Time in Forever also carry a sweet melody plus some exquisite character and story development. That’s what I love the most about musicals and why Disney always triumphs regarding this aspect: the way a simple song can tell so much about someone or move the plot forward. In my opinion, it’s the genre’s variation of “show, don’t tell.”

    In the end, Frozen might not be a groundbreaking animated film story-wise, but it delivers around 100 minutes of pure fun and entertainment. With an exceptional voice cast (Idina Menzel, Kristen Bell, and Josh Gad are wonderful), Chris Buck and Jennifer Lee are able to take Disney’s formula and create a worthy variation of the classic blueprint. From the emotionally compelling and well-developed characters to the eyegasmic animation quality, Frozen is a good time from start to finish. Boasting some memorable and catchy songs, it became one of the decade’s culturally most impactful animated movies. I wish exposition wasn’t overused, and that more risks were taken concerning the screenplay, but as a Disney animated flick, it meets the company’s standards.

    Rating: B

  • JPV852: Great animation and good voice talent, however pretty weak story but ultimately entertaining enough movie. Also found the music, outside of the song “Let It Go” (which was played to death for the past several years now) were rather forgettable and bland. **3.0/5**
  • r96sk: One of Disney’s best, in my opinion. Not quite top tier, but very close.

    ‘Frozen’ really did blow up when it was released, and rightly so. Sure it probably got overhyped but that isn’t the film’s fault. It’s a cracking watch, the pacing is absolutely spot on as are the musical numbers.

    What impresses me the most about the music is that it manages to keep the storytelling alive whilst it occurs. Particularly at the beginning there are loads of songs squeezed in next to each other, which could mess with the premise building but it doesn’t – it actually enhances it. The songs themselves are terrific, with “Let It Go” obviously getting the most plaudits.

    Idina Menzel (Elsa) and Kristen Bell (Anna) are excellent in the lead roles, while Josh Gad almost steals the show as Olaf – very funny character! Of course it’s aimed at the younger audience members, but it is still entertaining for us adult folk too – I’ve watched it a few times down the years and still thoroughly enjoy it.

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