Pretty Woman

When a millionaire wheeler-dealer enters a business contract with a Hollywood hooker Vivian Ward, he loses his heart in the bargain.
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Credits: TheMovieDb.

Film Cast:

  • Edward Lewis: Richard Gere
  • Vivian Ward: Julia Roberts
  • James Morse: Ralph Bellamy
  • Philip Stuckey: Jason Alexander
  • Kit De Luca: Laura San Giacomo
  • David Morse: Alex Hyde-White
  • Elizabeth Stuckey: Amy Yasbeck
  • Bridget: Elinor Donahue
  • Barney Thompson: Hector Elizondo
  • Susan: Judith Baldwin
  • Magician: Jason Randal
  • Howard: Bill Applebaum
  • Female Guest: Tracy Bjork
  • Male Guest: Gary Greene
  • Carlos: Billy Gallo
  • Happy Man: Abdul Salaam El Razzac
  • Detective: Hank Azaria
  • Landlord: Larry Hankin
  • Rachel: Julie Paris
  • Bermuda: Rhonda Hansome
  • Man in Car: Harvey Keenan
  • Tourist Man: Marty Nadler
  • Tourist Woman: Lynda Goodfriend
  • Cruiser: Reed Anthony
  • Pops: Frank Campanella
  • Artist: Jackie O’Brien
  • Angel: Cheri Caspari
  • Skateboard Kid: Scott Marshall
  • Night Elevator Operator Dennis: Patrick Richwood
  • Day Desk Clerk: Kathleen Marshall
  • Night Desk Clerk: Laurelle Mehus
  • Male Desk Clerk: Don Feldstein
  • Room Service Waiter: Marvin Braverman
  • Night Doorman: Al Sapienza
  • Day Doorman: Jeff Michalski
  • Day Bellhop: James Patrick Stuart
  • Bellhop: Lloyd T. Williams
  • Darryl The Limo Driver: R. Darrell Hunter
  • Lounge Pianist: James Patrick Dunne
  • Woman in Lobby: Valorie Armstrong
  • Italian Businessman: Steve Restivo
  • Japanese Businessman: Rodney Kageyama
  • American Businessman: Douglas Stitzel
  • Mr. Hollister: Larry Miller
  • Snobby Saleswoman: Dey Young
  • Marie: Shane Ross
  • Saleswoman: Carol Williard
  • Saleswoman: Minda Burr
  • Saleswoman: Robyn Peterson
  • Saleswoman: Mariann Aalda
  • Tie Salesman: RC Everbeck
  • Maitre D’: Michael French
  • Waiter: Allan Kent
  • Senator Adams: Stacy Keach, Sr.
  • Olsen Sister: Lucinda Crosby
  • Olsen Sister: Nancy Locke
  • Sod Stomping Announcer: Calvin Remsberg
  • Game Announcer: Lloyd Nelson
  • Polite Husband: Norman Large
  • Woman at Car: Tracy Reiner
  • Vance: Tom Nolan
  • Mark: John David Carson
  • Jake: Daniel Bardol
  • Violetta in “La Traviata”: Karin Calabro
  • Alfredo in “La Traviata”: Bruce Eckstut
  • Matron: Amzie Strickland
  • Usher: Mychael Bates
  • Bum Tour Guide (uncredited): Garry Marshall

Film Crew:

  • Producer: Arnon Milchan
  • Producer: Steven Reuther
  • Director: Garry Marshall
  • Author: J. F. Lawton
  • Original Music Composer: James Newton Howard
  • Director of Photography: Charles Minsky
  • Editor: Raja Gosnell
  • Editor: Priscilla Nedd-Friendly
  • Casting: Dianne Crittenden
  • Production Design: Albert Brenner
  • Executive Producer: Laura Ziskin
  • Costume Design: Marilyn Vance
  • Set Decoration: Garrett Lewis
  • Music Editor: Ellen Segal
  • Color Timer: Ron Lambert
  • Property Master: Rick Young
  • Art Direction: David M. Haber
  • Co-Producer: Gary W. Goldstein
  • Executive In Charge Of Production: David Hoberman
  • Costume Supervisor: Daniel J. Lester
  • Second Assistant Director: Bettiann Fishman
  • Supervising Sound Editor: Michael Hilkene
  • Production Executive: Mario Iscovich
  • First Assistant Director: Ellen H. Schwartz
  • Second Unit Director: Walter von Huene
  • Set Dressing Artist: Gary Isbell
  • Stunt Coordinator: Rick Avery
  • Makeup Artist: Bob Mills
  • Hairstylist: Carol A. O’Connell
  • Special Effects Coordinator: Gary Zink
  • Aerial Camera: Michael Kelem
  • Foley Mixer: Troy Porter
  • Foley Artist: Jerry Trent
  • Conductor: Marty Paich
  • Additional Casting: Dori Zuckerman
  • Chief Lighting Technician: Carl Boles
  • Script Supervisor: Adell Aldrich
  • Still Photographer: Ron Batzdorff
  • Leadman: Mark Woods
  • Aerial Coordinator: Robert ‘Bobby Z’ Zajonc
  • Key Costumer: Elinor Bardach
  • Sound Editor: Robert Fitzgerald
  • Boom Operator: Randall L. Johnson
  • Steadicam Operator: Randy Nolen
  • Location Manager: George Herthel
  • Camera Operator: Philip Caplan
  • First Assistant Camera: Tom Connole
  • First Assistant Editor: Thomas R. Bryant
  • Set Designer: Antoinette J. Gordon
  • ADR Editor: Chris Jargo
  • Supervising ADR Editor: Joseph A. Mayer
  • Set Costumer: Carlane Passman
  • Production Accountant: Allen E. Taylor
  • Assistant Property Master: Mychael Bates
  • Thanks: Barbara Marshall
  • Assistant Sound Editor: David Hagberg
  • Assistant Production Coordinator: Elyse Katz
  • Orchestrator: Brad Dechter
  • Assistant Camera: Maricella Ramirez
  • Post Production Supervisor: Angel Pine
  • Production Coordinator: Pat Chapman
  • Standby Painter: Tony Leonardi
  • Title Designer: Robert Dawson
  • Transportation Coordinator: Tom F. Thomas
  • Production Manager: Roger Joseph Pugliese
  • Sound Mixer: James E. Webb
  • Transportation Captain: Tom Briggs
  • Cableman: Harrison D. Marsh
  • Dolly Grip: Mike Schwake
  • Key Grip: Ben Beaird
  • Construction Foreman: Donald G. Helderle
  • Assistant Location Manager: Wally Uchida
  • Construction Coordinator: Ken Scaife
  • Grip: Gary C. Beaird
  • Set Production Assistant: Lennie Appelquist
  • Stunts: Reed Anthony
  • Unit Publicist: Katherine Ann Moore
  • Best Boy Electric: Anthony R. Collier
  • Assistant Editor: Craig Conwell
  • Second Assistant Camera: Frank Del Boccio
  • Executive Assistant: Diane Frazen
  • First Assistant Accountant: Kim Wozniak
  • Production Assistant: Wendy S. Hallin

Movie Reviews:

  • John Chard: A street credibility Pygmallion!

    Edward Lewis is a very rich man, but money, as everyone knows, does not buy everything, and as yet another failed relationship falls by the wayside, Edward faces up to the prospect of a hectic social week on his own. Enter a meeting with ebullient hooker Vivian Ward, who upon impressing Edward with her happy go lucky values, gets herself hired to be his escort for the week ahead, it’s a week that both of them are unlikely to ever forget.

    It almost became the in thing to stomp all over the respective work of both Richard Gere (Edward) and Julia Roberts (Vivian), adding fuel to the fire of those with an aversion to both actors is that the crowd pleasing Pretty Woman hails from that dreaded genre known as 1980s Rom-Com. Seemingly many can now not see just what made Pretty Woman so popular back in 1990. Gary Marshall’s film was the fourth highest box office taker in 1990, grossing a domestic $178,406,268, and at the same time made the date movie hip again, so basically all you Pretty Woman haters can take both those facts to the bank!

    As the opening credits emerge, Peter Cox (lead singer of pop band Go West) starts warbling about “The King Of Wishful Thinking”, and never was a more appropriate song used to open such a genre piece before or since, and this is the key issue with Pretty Woman. Yes, the whole structure and plot devices are all fanciful splendour, I mean does anyone seriously think that hookers look and act like Julia Roberts? But really if you are entering this picture expecting anything other than a modern “My Fair Lady” like fairytale then the blinkers need to be well and truly taken off. It’s also a point of worth to say that Pretty Woman has something to say outside of the main intention to lift hearts and make one smile, Marshall, aided by his screenwriter J.F. Lawton, tie in smartly the fact that Edward is as much a hustler as Vivian is, only difference being that Edward is incredibly wealthy and has therefore grown in public stature.

    Both Roberts and Gere have brilliant chemistry, so it was no surprise to see they would work together again in 1999 on “Runaway Bride”, and both actors are helped immeasurably by splendid support from Hector Elizondo as the hotel manager, Barney Thompson. The picture is laced with joyous moments that hark back to the golden days of screwy comedies laced with unlikely romances, and this was something that clearly struck a chord with cinema goers back on the film’s original release. Yes it’s a touch over sweet at times, and yes the ending is never really in doubt, but if you are prepared to invest some fluffy chilled out time with Pretty Woman then you can see and feel just why it was the big hit it was back at the start of the 90s. 8/10

  • John Chard: A street credible Pygmallion?

    Edward Lewis is a very rich man, but money, as everyone knows, does not buy everything, and as yet another failed relationship falls by the wayside, Edward faces up to the prospect of a hectic social week on his own. Enter a meeting with ebullient hooker Vivian Ward, who upon impressing Edward with her happy go lucky values, gets herself hired to be his escort for the week ahead, it’s a week that both of them are unlikely to ever forget.

    It almost became the in thing to stomp all over the respective work of both Richard Gere (Edward) and Julia Roberts (Vivian), adding fuel to the fire of those with an aversion to both actors is that the crowd pleasing Pretty Woman hails from that dreaded genre known as 1980s Rom-Com. Seemingly many can now not see just what made Pretty Woman so popular back in 1990. Gary Marshall’s film was the fourth highest box office taker in 1990, grossing a domestic $178,406,268, and at the same time made the date movie hip again, so basically all you Pretty Woman haters can take both those facts to the bank!

    As the opening credits emerge, Peter Cox (lead singer of pop band Go West) starts warbling about “The King Of Wishful Thinking”, and never was a more appropriate song used to open such a genre piece before or since, and this is the key issue with Pretty Woman. Yes, the whole structure and plot devices are all fanciful splendour, I mean does anyone seriously think that hookers look and act like Julia Roberts? But really if you are entering this picture expecting anything other than a modern “My Fair Lady” like fairytale then the blinkers need to be well and truly taken off. It’s also a point of worth to say that Pretty Woman has something to say outside of the main intention to lift hearts and make one smile, Marshall, aided by his screenwriter J.F. Lawton, tie in smartly the fact that Edward is as much a hustler as Vivian is, only difference being that Edward is incredibly wealthy and has therefore grown in public stature.

    Both Roberts and Gere have brilliant chemistry, so it was no surprise to see they would work together again in 1999 on “Runaway Bride”, and both actors are helped immeasurably by splendid support from Hector Elizondo as the hotel manager, Barney Thompson. The picture is laced with joyous moments that hark back to the golden days of screwy comedies laced with unlikely romances, and this was something that clearly struck a chord with cinema goers back on the film’s original release. Yes it’s a touch over sweet at times, and yes the ending is never really in doubt, but if you are prepared to invest some fluffy chilled out time with Pretty Woman then you can see and feel just why it was the big hit it was back at the start of the 90s. 8/10

  • Ryan: “You and I are such similar creatures, Vivian. We both screw people for money.”

    Richard Gere has always played a rich snob really well but I can’t help shake the feeling that Julia Roberts was shockingly miscast in this role. She does well but the role just doesn’t fit. Oh well, can’t win them all.

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