Trading Places

A snobbish investor and a wily street con-artist find their positions reversed as part of a bet by two callous millionaires.
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Credits: TheMovieDb.

Film Cast:

  • Louis Winthorpe III: Dan Aykroyd
  • Billy Ray Valentine: Eddie Murphy
  • Randolph Duke: Ralph Bellamy
  • Mortimer Duke: Don Ameche
  • Coleman: Denholm Elliott
  • Penelope Witherspoon: Kristin Holby
  • Clarence Beeks: Paul Gleason
  • Ophelia: Jamie Lee Curtis
  • President of Exchange: Alfred Drake
  • Pawnbroker: Bo Diddley
  • Corrupt Cop: Frank Oz
  • Harvey: Jim Belushi
  • Baggage Handler #1: Al Franken
  • Baggage Handler #2: Tom Davis
  • Duke & Duke Employee: Maurice Woods
  • Duke & Duke Employee: Richard D. Fisher, Jr.
  • Duke & Duke Employee: Jim Gallagher
  • Duke & Duke Employee: Anthony DiSabatino
  • Duke & Duke Employee: Bonnie Behrend
  • Duke & Duke Employee: Sunnie Merrill
  • Duke & Duke Employee: James Newell
  • Duke & Duke Employee: Mary St. John
  • Duke & Duke Employee: Bonnie Tremena
  • Duke & Duke Employee: David Schwartz
  • Duke Domestic: Tom Degidon
  • Duke Domestic: William Magerman
  • Duke Domestic: Alan Dellay
  • Duke Domestic: Florence Anglin
  • Duke Domestic: Ray D’Amore
  • Duke Domestic: Bobra Suiter
  • Duke Domestic: Herb Peterson
  • Duke Domestic: Sue Dugan
  • Duke Domestic: Walt Gorney
  • Duke Domestic: B. Constance Barry
  • Heritage Club Doorman: P. Jay Sidney
  • Ezra: Avon Long
  • Officer Pantuzzi: Tom Mardirosian
  • Officer Reynolds: Charles Brown
  • Todd: Robert Curtis Brown
  • Harry: Nicholas Guest
  • Andrew: John Bedford Lloyd
  • Philip: Tony Sherer
  • Attendant: Robert Earl Jones
  • Cop #1: Robert E. Lee
  • Cop #2: Peter Hock
  • Doo Rag Lenny: Clint Smith
  • Big Black Guy: Ron Taylor
  • Even Bigger Black Guy: James D. Turner
  • Cellmate #2: Giancarlo Esposito
  • Cellmate #3: Steve Hofvendahl
  • Guard: James Eckhouse
  • President of Heritage Club: Gwyllum Evans
  • Cop #3: Eddie Jones
  • Cop #4: John McCurry
  • Hooker #1: Michelle Mais
  • Hooker #2: Barra Khan
  • Bartender: Bill Cobbs
  • Party Goer: Joshua Daniel
  • Creepy Man: Jacques Sandulescu
  • Bank Manager: W.B. Brydon
  • Duke & Duke Receptionist: Margaret H. Flynn
  • Muffy: Kelly Curtis
  • Constance: Tracey K. Shaffer
  • Bunny: Susan Fallender
  • President’s Mistress: Lucianne Buchanan
  • Jr. Executive #1: Paul Garcia
  • Jr. Executive #2: Jed Gillin
  • Ophelia’s Client: Jimmy Raitt
  • Duke’s Secretary: Kate Taylor
  • Doctor: Philip Bosco
  • Newscaster: Bill Boggs
  • Harvey’s Girlfriend: Deborah Reagan
  • Gorilla: Don McLeod
  • Stationmaster: Stephen Stucker
  • Wilson: Richard Hunt
  • Trader #1: Paul Austin
  • Trader #2: John Randolph Jones
  • Trader #3: Jack Davidson
  • Trader #4: Bernie McInerney
  • Secretary of Agriculture: Maurice Copeland
  • Official #1: Ralph Clanton
  • Official #2: Bryan Clark
  • Longshoreman: Gary Klar
  • Longshoreman: Afemo Omilami
  • Monica: Shelly Chee Chee Hall
  • Gladys: Donna Palmer
  • Demitri: Barry Dennen
  • Man at Police Station (uncredited): Murray Bandel
  • Stray Dog (uncredited): Benjean
  • Man Sitting on Couch at Party (uncredited): John Black
  • Man with Briefcase (uncredited): John Landis
  • Bag Lady (uncredited): Shirley Levine
  • Cop (uncredited): Charles Pendelton
  • Girl in Park (uncredited): Yvonna Russell
  • Man in Police Station (uncredited): Jan Saint
  • Woman at Party (uncredited): Arleen Sorkin
  • Rolls Royce Driver (uncredited): Ronald Sylvers
  • Woman Passed Out on Couch (uncredited): Marlene Willoughby

Film Crew:

  • Casting: Bonnie Timmermann
  • Director: John Landis
  • Sound Editor: Samuel C. Crutcher
  • Production Design: Gene Rudolf
  • Original Music Composer: Elmer Bernstein
  • Executive Producer: George Folsey Jr.
  • Costume Design: Deborah Nadoolman
  • Supervising Sound Editor: Charles L. Campbell
  • Director of Photography: Robert Paynter
  • Editor: Malcolm Campbell
  • Screenplay: Herschel Weingrod
  • Screenplay: Timothy Harris
  • Producer: Aaron Russo
  • Producer: Irwin Russo
  • Producer: Sam Williams
  • Music: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
  • Set Decoration: George DeTitta Jr.
  • Set Decoration: George DeTitta Sr.
  • Sound Mixer: James Sabat
  • Hairstylist: Frank Bianco
  • Assistant Costume Designer: Gary Jones
  • Sound Re-Recording Mixer: Robert Knudson
  • Sound Re-Recording Mixer: Robert Glass
  • Sound Editor: Larry Mann
  • Sound Re-Recording Mixer: Don Digirolamo
  • Assistant Sound Editor: Chuck Neely
  • Sound Recordist: Frank Graziadei
  • Script Supervisor: Renee Bodner
  • Assistant Art Director: Linda Conaway-Parsloe
  • Sound Editor: Bruce Richardson
  • Sound Editor: Jerry Stanford
  • Sound Editor: Larry Carow
  • Makeup Artist: Jack Engel
  • Assistant Camera: Hank Muller
  • Special Effects: Andy Perillo

Movie Reviews:

  • John Chard: The Prince and the Pauper with Eddie & Dan on sparkling form.

    Mortimer & Randolph Duke are two repugnantly rich brothers, they make a bet that sees the role reversal of top toff yuppie, Louis Winthorpe, and wise cracking street hustler bum, Billy Ray Valentine. That’s about the strength of the films plot, yet it makes for a very funny film that crackles with glee due to it’s excellently written script. Watching the respective characters rise and fall respectively creates laughs aplenty whilst asking the question of how we all would cope in similar circumstances?

    Sure the film does beat one over the head with its social message, we are in no doubt from the off about the gap between the rich and the poor, and yes the colour of a persons skin also rears its ugly head here to make this one of the more braver comedies of the 80s. Billy Ray Valentine (a brilliant dual performance from Eddie Murphy) is elevated up the social ladder, he becomes a force in industry, but as the progression enthrals him it also makes him aware that the things at the top end of the ladder aren’t exactly stand up doings. Winthorpe (a perfectly casted Dan Ackroyd) drops further down the social ladder and resorts to behaviour that nobody from the upper echelons could ever have dreamed he would be capable of – it’s only an encounter with prostitute Ophelia (Jamie Lee Curtis at the peak of her sexiness), and her good heart, that starts to see an upturn in his now dead bottom fortunes.

    The gags come thick and fast, both verbally (Murphy on fire) and visually, as the film sees the whole cast fusing together to create a cracking comedy. Come the denouement on Wall Street we are privy to a joyous and savage turn of events that ice the clever Christmas cake we have just digested. It does have an 80s sheen about it, and viewing now in post 9/11 times it’s got a tint of nostalgia value to it, but really it’s all about the script, the stars and a kick in the eye for those who think nothing of treading on the people below them, enjoy. 8/10

  • JPV852: Seen this one numerous times over the years, not quite a laugh-out-loud riot or anything but still pretty funny throughout with great performances all around. Although their screen time together was mostly limited to the last 30-minutes, Dan Aykroyd and Eddie Murphy were great as were Denholm Elliott and Jamie Lee Curtis (hot as hell). Also appreciate Ralph Bellamy and Don Ameche as the pompous and terrible villains. **4.0/5**
  • Peter89Spencer: Is it offensive? Very much. Is it worth watching? Absolutely. Is it funny as hell? Hell yeah!

    This classic OUTRAGEOUS comedy caper is the perfect holiday film to watch in between Christmas and New Year’s Eve.

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